Monthly Archives: June 2013

Garden 2013–Let There Be Light!

100_7833 (1)

Dear Reader:

Here we are at the end of June, and my garden boxes are just beginning to fill in. I started late this year, missing my Memorial Day Weekend planting deadline. I picked up baby plants hither, thither, and yon–Tibbetts Family Farm for herbs and a thistle, Newfield Farmers’ & Artisans’ Market for tomatoes and a few more herbs, Snell Family Farm for veggies and flowers. Tibbetts again for truckloads of compost and compost/loam mix.

We also had 26 pine trees cut off the property–a mutually beneficial arrangement where the guys cut the trees in exchange for the lumber. Can I just say…HOORAY! What a difference this is making around my yard. Sunlight hits the garden boxes at least three more hours per day. Another area that was completely shaded from 11 a.m. until dark now gets more light than any other spot on the property, and my brain is turning and tumbling with ideas of creating a branching permaculture style garden there. First, though, there is the keyhole bed to finish, the hugelkultur garden to complete and plant, and–oh, yeah–making edging beds around the new forest perimeters so the blackberry brambles do not get a toehold.

While I have managed to plant the square-foot garden boxes, this will be the summer of garden bed preparation and transplanting of perennials, where possible. So glad I purchased a CSA share–the produce comes to me to me in large brown paper bags, all ready to eat. I’ve consumed more greens over the past month than I did all last year, I swear!

Anyway, here are the garden boxes this year, for a record.

Box One

100_7818

row 1: radishes; row 2: oregano, thyme, rosemary, thyme, oregano; row 3: garlic chives; row 4: borage, milk thistle, borage; row 5: dill inter-planted with spinach seeds.

Box Two

100_7819

row 1: tomatoes; row 2: sage, lettuces, shiso, green pepper; row 3: lettuces, chocolate mint (perennial), lemon balm (perennial)

Box Three

100_7820

row 1: petunias; row 2: sweet woodruff, basil, savory: row 3: bronze fennel, fennel, bronze fennel (radishes interplanted)

Box Four

100_7821

center: four pink salvia; corners: pickling cukes; spaces: salad greens mix

Box Five

100_7822

row 1: radishes; rows 2 & 3: kale, broccoli raabe, hot pepper; row 4: hot pepper, parsley, celery

Box 6

100_7824

row 1: calendula; row 2: fennel, celery, celery, fennel; row 3: basil, celery, celery, basil; row 4: zucchini

Box 7

100_7825

row 1: petunia, basil, petunia, pickling cuke; row 2: red pepper, fennel, curly parsley, red pepper; row 3: lettuce seeds, pickling cuke, summer squash, summer squash; row 4: spinach seeds

Box 8

100_7826

row 1: petunia, parsley, parsley, petunia; row 2: onions all across from seed; row 3: snapdragon, bachelor button, zinnia, dill from seeds; row 4: romaine lettuce and green lettuce from seed

Box 9

100_7827

First two rows: peas; Second two rows: bush beans

New Keyhole garden

100_7719

This will be the apple guild eventually. Apple tree will go in the back surrounded by borage, dandelion, comfrey, beans, and daffodils. The “arms” will be planted with various stuff. I stuck some alyssum, camomile, and butterfly weed in there, but more compost and loam is going to be added.

Hugelkultur garden

100_7832

100_7829

This is a big hole where a stump used to be. The stump I tried to “rot” with lime and a plastic covering a couple years ago. When the tree guys came, they hauled it off (and took the beginnings of my hugelkultur garden with it!) I restacked the sticks and greeny stuff, started dumping on compost and old leaves, and will continue to work on it over the summer, eventually covering with a few inches of compost/loam. I wanted to plant potatoes and squash in there. Perhaps if I get my butt in gear…if not, there is next year. Maybe better to get some manure and throw it on and let it age over the winter anyway?

Various flower and perennial beds are looking fine. I have an elderberry to plant and one to transplant from its current location.

So, that is my 2013 garden so far. I am loving my plot of land now that the light is coming in. Now, I better sign off and get out there to work!

Social currency

Waterboro Reporter

Waterboro Reporter

The photo above was provided by the owner/publisher of the newspaper for which I work. The Waterboro Reporter is a locally-owned, weekly community paper that pays me for the articles I write–many about sustainability, local farmers and business people, local non-profit organization, school news, town government and activist groups. The Reporter is, I believe, an important part of the “local circle.” It is a free-to-read newspaper, with printing costs and content (read: writers like me!) costs covered only by advertising dollars, not readers.

I love the idea of currency circulating from one local business to the next local business via paychecks and purchases. This is the essence of a local economy. It also creates a type of social currency: measured only in goodwill and reciprocity.

Here is a real example: Last month, the Reporter sold advertising space to local businesses and printed up some ads that readers were sure to notice as they read the content of the paper. Then the Reporter collected the advertising money from those businesses. Last week, the Reporter sent me a check for my articles. I cashed my check on Saturday and went immediately to the Newfield Farmer’s Market–where I bought close to $25 worth of stuff. Now, if the market then took out an advertisement in the following week’s paper, the local economic circle would be complete! The money would just continue circulating–maybe going to out to a local antique store or the local supermarket–but eventually, hopefully, coming right back around and around and around.

THIS cycle is exactly what I’ve been writing about/advocating for the past four years!

Over the course of a year, with money earned from my writing gig, I’ve bought local maple syrup, a Community Supported Agriculture membership from a local farmer, and an order for a year’s worth of beef from a Limerick neighbor. I’ve shopped at the local supermarket and had countless lunches at local restaurants like the Clipper Merchant Tea House and the Peppermill. I’ve donated money to charitable causes (guess where I went on Saturday afternoon, after the market? The Limerick Historical Society penny auction.)I’ve bought incense,books, toys and other interesting stuff at local gift shops. My love for Plummer’s Hardware and the Limerick Supermarket is well-known.

Much of this I’ve documented here on Localista and shared with my facebook friends and my email list, which is also free publicity for the local businesses I love. In turn, these businesses provide me with excellent customer service and great products.

The money I spend comes from a locally owned paper whose only income–I will stress this again–is advertising. This is a newspaper that has been amazing to publish all the stories I’ve written with a sustainability slant, promoting the kind of “buy local” philosophy I hold dear. The Reporter doesn’t “sell” newspaper coverage. It covers stories we think are interesting and important whether or not an ad is purchased; however, think about that local cycle a minute. Now think some more…

Readers, please shop locally, and if you shop at one of our advertisers, let them know you saw their ad in the paper. Supporting each other, in a local economy, is the foundation of freedom from corporate control. Be part of the circle!