Tag Archives: spindle whorls

Days 24 & 25: Not So Happy Feet

Beside The Pool

Dear Reader:

A most important word about travel and sightseeing. Moderation.

Since I was in pretty good shape before embarking on this D.C. adventure, I really didn’t give my physical condition much thought. In the spring, I’d overdone it a bit with some running and had a bout of heel spur pain, but a few weeks of rest and bicycling took care of it. I also started wearing those special kind of sneakers with the curved bottoms. Very cushiony. Very good for the heels.

Shelley's Eye-View from Her Chaise

Apparently, not so good for the ankles. After three weeks of almost daily walking, the outer edge of my right foot began to ache whenever I stepped down. Just a little ache, but I’m not going to risk greater injury. So for the next few days I will be sitting beside the pool, reading Candace Bushnell novels, and working on my tan (I use an SPF 45 lotion which allows me to turn a nice golden color without burning.)

The day before my self-imposed house-arrest, Hubby and I biked over to the Museum of the American Indian. The Teen and I had explored the “Our Universes” exhibit thoroughly, but Hubby had yet to visit. We arrived in time to take one of the guided tours, led by a really nice young woman from the Lakota tribe. After the tour, we took our time in the “Our Lives: Contemporary Life and Identities” exhibit and also spent some more time in the “Our Universes” exhibit where I was able to revisit some of my favorite stories and philosophies and ponder how our country might have been shaped if we had embraced some of these native peoples’ teachings and interwoven them with our own instead of conquering and trying to eradicate these important, vibrant cultures.

(Contact with Europeans and disease led to an upwards of 90% fatality rate among the native peoples. That was BEFORE guns and Christianity came along! Sad.)

"Sacred Circle" by Susan Point, 2003-2004

Taking the time to look more closely at some of the exhibits on the first floor, I was thrilled to find these spindle whorls used by North Pacific Coast women to spin mountain goat wool into thread or yarn. Susan Point’s spindle represents “women’s power, creativity, and contributions to society.”

Moccasins

Here are some more shoes for my D.C. Shoe Scavenger Hunt. Embroidered and beaded moccasins were often designed to show the status or family group of the individual. Okay, I’m a little shoe and foot obsessed right now, but do you see how gorgeous these are? I’d love to see a return to handmade shoes made by skilled craftspeople. Wouldn’t it be great to go down to the local cobbler–or to be precise, cordwainer or cordonnier–for a pair of shoes rather than to the shopping mall? We don’t even manufacture shoes here in America anymore. I hope there are craftspeople from various backgrounds and communities holding onto and passing down the knowledge and skills as we move toward an uncertain future.

Gustoweh

In the Mohawk tradition, the leaders were men and wore headdresses like this one. Yes, the leaders were men, but guess who chose the leaders or got rid of them when they weren’t doing a good job of it? The women. Now that seems like a system that makes sense. Balance. Something our leaders should be looking at right now just over the river from where I’m sitting.

Diablada Mask, ca. 1975

The Bolivian “Diablada Mask” shown here represents the struggle between angels & demons, good & evil. As John McCain recently quipped, “It’s hard to do the Lord’s work in the Devil’s City.”

Oasis In The City

As for me, I’m going to try to stop worrying. After all, there is a chaise longue with my name on it downstairs beside the pool. Now, where did I leave my sunglasses . . .